The Retina­pocalypse: A Case Study

The ‘retinapocalypse‘ refers to a worrying new trend in web design which threatens to usher in a new age of information elitism. Its emergence owes itself to the proliferation of smartphones and tablets with high-resolution displays which can render text in crisp detail, arguably more legibly than print.

Graphic designers seem to have developed a form of tunnel-vision for these devices. Imagine their smug satisfaction as they recline their over-priced ergonomic chairs in a swanky over-styled Collingwood office. They’ve just spent weeks on the publication’s digital re-branding, involving countless hours staring into their 4K iMacs. It looks beautiful on their screen and fantastic in print, what could go wrong?

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Movie Review: The Hunger Games: Catching Fire

Unrequited infatuation, friendzoning, and romantic conflict permeates, giving the film an undertone of futility; a metaphor for the dystopic world of the Hunger Games series. Yes, the film has its Twilight moments. But redemption comes in the form of the smouldering uprising against the oppression of The Capitol alluded to in the film’s title. Overall, it’s impressive, however I left feeling like it wants so badly to make a commentary on the shallowness of present day media and society in general; but doesn’t quite make it. Like The Capitol is so ridiculous it’s almost satire. Maybe thats the point. ★★★★

Movie Review: After Earth

After Earth

I started watching AFTER EARTH as if it were an 80s b-grade sci-fi movie in the hope that I wouldn’t be disappointed. The first 20 minutes of the film reminded me strongly of JOHN CARTER, so hope of this being a workable strategy was fading fast. Nevertheless, I pressed on.

After watching this film, I feel *so* sorry for Jaden Smith. Not only does the poor kid have to live his real life in his father Will Smith’s shadow, he has to star in a movie where the entire plot is about… a kid living in his father’s shadow. No wonder Jaden’s only expression throughout the film is that of a sullen teenager.

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Microsoft and Nokia

So Microsoft bought Nokia. I can’t say I’m surprised. It will be interesting to see if this can bring them back from the brink of irrelevancy. I love the look of Windows Phone as an OS, and have been quite outspoken on my anticipation for the Nokia Lumia 1020 as the ultimate travel companion. However, Microsoft needs to experience a fundamental attitude shift if they’re going to claw their way back into the mobile devices market.

The Apple vs. Android vs. Microsoft debate is thoroughly uninteresting. Each platform has their strengths and weaknesses. Apple got there first with shiny touch phones and pioneered the App Store business model. Google snatched up the software-only market by stealing Microsoft’s modus operandi—build the OS and the cheap hardware will come, along with butt-loads of market-share. Microsoft is kind of a wild card. They’re that arrogant corporate jock that storms in late and gate-crashes the hipster/nerd frat party. Google’s dominance and market share is quite straightforward. Android is popular, not because it’s good, but because it’s free and it’s “good enough”. The interesting debate, and the only one worth having, is about brand attitude.

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Book Review: Childhood’s End by Arthur C. Clarke

Bored with technology & the Internet, I recently resolved to get back into books, specifically, classic science fiction. First on the list was a utopian novel by veteran Arthur C. Clarke, most well-known for 2001: A Space Odyssey. I chose one of his earlier novels.

Just as the human space-race begins to heat up, aliens descend on Earth but it’s ok because they are nice aliens, or so they say. They become our “guardians” and prevent us from destroying ourselves but they don’t tell us why…

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